Yes, Twice

We arrived early and scored an amazing parking space. I was floating on air, with anticipation the only possibility of bringing me back to my seat while reminders to silence cell phones played across a large screen.

I thought back to my experience reading the trilogy. The books spoke to me more than most books I have read and enjoyed–helping me see past fear and focus on the power of relationships, values, and choice.

Of course, I could hardly wait for the film’s opening night.

I purchased my tickets two weeks early. (I can’t remember the last time I’ve done that…if ever.)

The moment arrived, and the credits began to take their places on the screen in front of us.

When the film ended, though, I felt heavy and exhausted. I bemoaned the fact that I promised to bring two of my kiddos (who also read and enjoyed the books) to watch it. I wasn’t sure I wanted to sit through it again. I processed what reasoning I could find for my feelings…but was at a loss. 😦

I spent the next day heavily in thought, wondering if the changes from book format to film adaptation were bothering me. I considered other books-made-into-films that I had seen as an adult, but I couldn’t shake the let down I felt from this weekend.

Finally, on my return trip to the theater the next evening, I put some pieces together. I was looking for an intimate experience, one of connection with characters, one which reminded me of the triumph of human spirit I recognized within myself as I read of their struggles cuddled in a blanket on my couch. I didn’t get that through my first theater experience.

I approached my second viewing more analytically. I felt much more closure and was able to process what I actually liked or didn’t like regarding the adaptation to film–and I can honestly say that I enjoyed the experience.

Yes, watching the film was so different from reading the book (isn’t it always?), but seeing the setting and characters take shape while experiencing highlights of the story again filled me with a greater appreciation for writers and those who direct and adapt to the screen. What an amazing process!

Overall, I would see Divergent again. Want to come with me?

Love…True Love

I remember laughing so hard my insides hurt when I first watched Peter Cook recite these famous lines:

I laughed even more when a dear friend of mine, who I dare say captured the essence of Peter Cook’s delivery of those lines, along with her own comedic flair, would recite those beloved lines.

“Wuv…troo wuv….”

Well, I am writing today because I have been considering “The Thing Called Love” (which, incidentally, was a movie I enjoyed back in the day but haven’t revisited for years). Before you go “blame it on your lyin’, cheatin’, cold, dead-beatin’, two-timin’, double-dealin’, mean, mistreatin’, lovin’ heart,” you might want to consider LOVE for a little while, too…and more specifically the opportunity or possibility for an eternal or timeless love….

I am not a big Twilight fan.  I haven’t read any of the books; I never waited in line or paid for a ticket to see any of the films.  I did, however, out of respect for cultural literacy, decide (maybe at about the time New Moon was released) that I would probably ClearPlay most of the films by the end of the series.  As of last night, I have completed watching the films (mainly due to one of my children’s unlikely fascination with the franchise)…and as I have pondered what I have learned and the attraction of the story, I have some thoughts to share.

I believe in eternal love.  I believe that relationships exist beyond this life, and that we can be with our loved ones again who are currently separated from us because of death.  I also believe in the immortality of the soul.  I do not, however, believe in the reality of vampires (no matter what history might say about Abraham Lincoln hunting them) :).  Still, I think the medium of vampire culture serves a purpose to paint a picture of a loving, supportive family, with couples who honor vows to one another.

Could our disposable society learn anything from these messages?  (Here I would like to insert my belief that I do support the option of divorce in particular circumstances…but I think people often throw away relationships that could be saved with effort and work much like they throw away their fast food wrappers and paper plates after dinner….)

I am also captivated by the story found in The Time Traveler’s Wife.  While I found the abundant profanity in the book offensive and skimmed over some graphic sex scenes, I felt compelled to finish the book.  As I read, the power of a committed relationship that did not bend to time taught me again and again.  Now, I do not believe in time travel (though I do find the Back to the Future movies highly entertaining).  What draws me to this story is the decision two people made to be together, to grow together, to live through challenges together, and to love each other fiercely.

I have heard that any two people committed to each other and committed to God can make a marriage work.  Not to say that some people aren’t more well-suited to each other…some are.  Still, committment is key in making a relationship work.  And, every day anyone in a relationship wakes up each morning and makes a decision to stay with that person (or not).  This decision may not be consciously made, but it is made nonetheless.  And the decision is yours to make your love…[a] true love that will stand the test of time (and maybe even eternity).